Mae West

It’s the bUnknownirthday of actress and playwright Mae West, born in Brooklyn, New York (1893). She became famous for her quippy innuendoes and double entendres. Some of her more notable quotes include:

“A dame that knows the ropes isn’t likely to get tied up.” “Between two evils, I like to pick the one I haven’t tried before.” “I used to be Snow White, but I drifted.” “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” “A hard man is good to find.” “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.”

She was encouraged as a performer by her mother, who, according to West, always thought that anything Mae did was fantastic. Other family members were less encouraging, including an aunt and her paternal grandmother. They are all reported as having disapproved of her career and her choices.  In 1918, after exiting several high-profile revues, West finally got her break in the Shubert Brothers revue Sometime, opposite Ed Wynn. Her character Mayme danced the shimmy and her photograph appeared on an edition of the sheet music for the popular number “Ev’rybody Shimmies Now”.

Eventually, she began writing her own risqué plays using the pen name Jane Mast. Her first starring role on Broadway was in a 1926 play she entitled Sex, which she wrote, produced, and directed. Although critics panned the show, ticket sales were good. The production did not go over well with city officials, and the theater was raided, with West arrested along with the cast. She was taken to the Jefferson Market Court House, (now Jefferson Market Library) where she was prosecuted on morals charges and, on April 19, 1927, was sentenced to ten days for “corrupting the morals of youth.”

While incarcerated on Welfare Island (now known as Roosevelt Island), she dined with the warden and his wife; she told reporters that she had worn her silk panties while serving time.She served eight days with two days off for good behavior. Media attention surrounding the incident enhanced her career.

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DRILLING IN THE ARCTIC BY PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA

DRILLING IN THE ARCTIC

Response from President Barack ObamaUnknown

The White House, Washington


Dear Kenneth:

Thank you for writing. The Arctic is a unique and fragile environment where the ocean sustains both people and wildlife, and I have acted to protect some of its most important areas. I have made Alaska’s Bristol Bay off-limits to drilling, along with 10 million acres in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, and I have called for even greater protection for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Additionally, my Administration is taking unprecedented steps to address climate change by accelerating our transition to cleaner energy sources and cutting carbon dioxide emissions. We are also working with other nations to advance cleaner energy technologies, enhance energy efficiency, promote best practices for reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, and aid developing countries in increasing their own resilience to climate change.

Still, we must recognize that we cannot complete this transition overnight, which means we will continue to rely partly on fossil fuels. I understand the risks of offshore drilling, and that is why my Administration has overhauled Federal oversight and raised the bar on safety across the board—including by setting even higher standards for Shell in the Arctic. The Department of the Interior did not grant conditional approval of Shell’s exploration plan until having a high level of confidence that they would meet all applicable requirements. Shell still needs to secure additional approvals in advance of taking action, and if they move forward, the Administration will monitor their activities carefully to ensure full compliance with a strict set of environmental and safety regulations.

Again, thank you for writing. It’s up to all of us to protect our planet, and I’m confident that together we can meet the environmental challenges of our time.

Sincerely,

Barack Obama

HOW TO WRITE GOOD

78a2c06a-6a93-4756-8bcf-b406d775c650The first set of rules was written by Frank L. Visco and originally published in the June 1986 issue of Writers’ Digest.

My several years in the word game have learnt me several rules:

1. Avoid Alliteration. Always.

2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.

3. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They’re old hat.)

4. Employ the vernacular.

5. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.

6. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary.

7. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.

8. Contractions aren’t necessary.

9. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.

10. One should never generalize.

11. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”

12. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

13. Don’t be redundant; don’t use more words than necessary; it’s highly superfluous.

14. Profanity sucks.

15. Be more or less specific. 1

6. Understatement is always best.

17. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

18. One word sentences? Eliminate.

19. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.

20. The passive voice is to be avoided.

21. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.

22. Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.

23. Who needs rhetorical questions?

This second set of rules is derived from William Safire’s Rules for Writers.

1. Parenthetical words however must be enclosed in commas.

2. It behooves you to avoid archaic expressions.

3. Avoid archaeic spellings too.

4. Don’t repeat yourself, or say again what you have said before.

5. Don’t use commas, that, are not, necessary.

6. Do not use hyperbole; not one in a million can do it effectively.

7. Never use a big word when a diminutive alternative would suffice.

8. Subject and verb always has to agree.

9. Placing a comma between subject and predicate, is not correct.

10. Use youre spell chekker to avoid mispeling and to catch typograhpical errers.

11. Don’t repeat yourself, or say again what you have said before.

12. Use the apostrophe in it’s proper place and omit it when its not needed.

13. Don’t never use no double negatives. 1

4. Poofread carefully to see if you any words out.

15. Hopefully, you will use words correctly, irregardless of how others use them.

16. Eschew obfuscation.

17. No sentence fragments.
18. Don’t indulge in sesquipedalian lexicological constructions.

19. A writer must not shift your point of view.

20. Don’t overuse exclamation marks!!

21. Place pronouns as close as possible, especially in long sentences, as of 10 or more words, to their antecedents.

22. Writing carefully, dangling participles must be avoided.

23. If any word is improper at the end of a sentence, a linking verb is.

24. Avoid trendy locutions that sound flaky.

25. Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.

26. Always pick on the correct idiom.

27. The adverb always follows the verb.

28. Take the bull by the hand and avoid mixing metaphors.

29. If you reread your work, you can find on rereading a great deal of repetition can be by rereading and editing.

30. And always be sure to finish what

Cannabis: The Most Important Vegetable on the Planet

http://wakeup-world.com/2015/08/02/cannabis-the-most-important-vegetable-on-the-planet/

Cannabis: The Most Important Vegetable on the Planet

Cannabis The Most Important Vegetable on the Planet

2nd August 2015

By Carolanne Wright

Contributing Writer for Wake Up World

“If cannabis were discovered in the Amazon rainforest today, people would be clambering to make as much use as they could of all of the potential benefits of the plant. Unfortunately, it carries with it a long history of being a persecuted plant.” ~ Dr. Donald Abrams, Chief of Hematology Oncology at San Francisco General Hospital

Approximately 106,000 Americans die yearly from prescribed medications, according to the American Medical Association. Even more frightening, preventable medical errors account for a staggering 400,000 deaths in the U.S. each year — and is considered the 3rd leading cause of death. “It’s equivalent to 2,000 commercial jets taking off each year knowing that they don’t have enough fuel to complete their journeys,” notes Peter Edelstein M.D. “Would you allow your spouse to board one of those planes? Your friend? A stranger?”

Good question. Increasingly, people in the West are seeking out treatments that work harmoniously with the body, instead of against it — in other words, they’re walking away from the medical establishment and all its mishaps, mistakes and pharmaceutical drugs. A case in point is cannabis, especially in its raw form.

A Rich History

Marijuana is one of those plants that, to many, conjures visions of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raids and hippies in a drugged-out daze. But it wasn’t always this way.

“The ancient Chinese knew of marijuana’s pain-relieving and mind-altering effects, yet it was not widely employed for its psychoactive properties; instead it was cultivated as hemp for the manufacture of rope and fabric. Likewise, the ancient Greeks and Romans used hemp to make rope and sails. In some other places, however, marijuana’s intoxicating properties became important. In India, for example, the plant was incorporated into religious rituals. During the Middle Ages, its use was common in Arab lands; in 15th-century Iraq it was used to treat epilepsy; in Egypt it was primarily consumed as an inebriant. After Napoleon’s occupation of Egypt, Europeans began using the drug as an intoxicant. During the slave trade, it was transported from Africa to Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. Marijuana gained a following in the U.S. only relatively recently. During the second half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, cannabis was freely available without a prescription for a wide range of ailments, including migraine and ulcers,” Roger A. Nicoll and Bradley N. Alger remind us in Scientific American.

Even American Founding Father Thomas Jefferson declared: “Hemp is of first necessity to the wealth and protection of the country.”

So what happened?

In 1937, the United States Congress decided — against the recommendation of the American Medical Association — to pass the Marijuana Tax Act. The legislation essentially banned the use of marijuana by making it excessively expensive and difficult to secure. It has been downhill ever since. That is, until the last few years where legalization of marijuana has exploded in the U.S., for both recreational and medicinal uses. For our purposes here, we’re going to look at the health benefits of the plant — which are quite impressive.

An Essential Vegetable

“It [cannabis] has captured these molecules that help our bodies regulatory system be more effective. The bottom line is it’s a dietary essential that helps all 210 cell types function more effectively. I don’t even refer to it as medicine anymore, strictly as a dietary essential.” ~ Dr. William L. Courtney

It may be a stretch for some to recognize raw cannabis as the next in-demand superfood, but Dr. Courtney, a physician with extensive medical training who specializes in the dietary uses of cannabis, presents a provocative case.

When you heat or age cannabis, Dr. Courtney believes that you lose 99% of the benefit cannabis provides. In contrast, if you consume it raw, you’ll reap the full value of the plant. Plus, raw cannabis is non-psychoactive, so you won’t experience a high — an important point for those who would like to utilize the healing aspects of cannabis without feeling drugged or off-center. This means you can also consume a much higher amount of health-promoting compounds with raw cannabis juice compared to if it was smoked or extracted as an oil, according to Dr. Courtney.

Terpenes, essential oils found in cannabis which give the plant its unique aroma, are particularly compelling. A study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology states that terpenoids are “pharmacologically versatile: they are lipophilic, interact with cell membranes, neuronal and muscle ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors, G-protein coupled (odorant) receptors, second messenger systems and enzymes.”

The researchers explored the powerful effect terpenes exert in animal tests. Limonene was found to increase serotonin in the prefrontal cortex and dopamine in the hippocampus region of the brain — both of which help fend-off depression and feelings of stress. Moreover, limonene induces apoptosis (cell death) of breast cancer cells and demonstrated exceptional radical scavenging properties. It’s also remarkably bioavailable, rapidly metabolized and is highly non-toxic and non-sensitizing.

Myrcene is anti-inflammatory and an effective sleep aid, while pinene acts as a bronchodilator and broad spectrum antibiotic — including the destruction of lethal MRSA bacteria. Pinene also curbs inflammation. Linalool is a sedative and anticonvulsant. Caryophyllene is antimalarial, anti-inflammatory and useful in treating duodenal ulcers. Nerolidol inhibits fungal growth and protozoal parasites. Phytol increases GABA expression, resulting in a calming effect. These are just a handful of the 200 varieties of terpenes found in cannabis.

How to Enjoy More Raw Cannabis in Your Life

For a daily dose, Dr. Courtney advises juicing fifteen cannabis leaves and two buds, which is then added to a small amount of fruit or vegetable juice that is consumed throughout the day. If you would like to learn more about juicing cannabis, this article article offers tips and suggestions. Keep in mind that juicing improperly may create heat, which will cause THC to form. Jeffrey C. Raber, Ph.D. also recommends having the strain of marijuana you’re using tested at a reliable and accurate lab so you know exactly what you are getting.

Article sources:

MATA HARI

MTIwNjA4NjMzOTEwMzYzNjYwIt’s the birthday of the Dutch dancer and spy Mata Hari, born Margaretha Zelle in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands (1876). She attended a teachers college and then married an army officer, Captain Rudolph MacLeod, in 1895. They lived in Java and Sumatra for a few years, and that’s where she picked up her eventual byname. “Mata Hari” is a Malay term for the sunrise, and means “the eye of the day.” The MacLeod marriage was marked by infidelity on both sides. He gave her syphilis, which was in turn inherited by their two children. After their son died, the parents began to hate each other. They returned to Holland and divorced, and MacLeod took out an ad in the local paper telling shopkeepers not to give his ex-wife any credit, because he would not be supporting her any longer. In order to make some money, she began dancing professionally in Paris in 1905, and occasionally worked in a high-class brothel.

The exact nature of her spy activities is not clear, but she probably didn’t engage in much actual espionage. She was well known by sight all over Europe. She had apparently sold some outdated information about France to the Germans in 1916, and then later made a deal with the head of French intelligence to spy on the Germans in exchange for a pass to visit her Russian lover in the eastern war zone. The French became suspicious that she was a double agent, and she never was able to provide much useful information, so she was tried, convicted, and executed by firing squad in 1917. One of her prosecutors later admitted, “There wasn’t enough evidence [against her] to flog a cat.”

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READ CHLOE THURLOW’S TAKE ON MATA HARI AT
https://scriggler.com/DetailPost/Opinion/1439

NEW HARVARD STUDY ON PESTICIDES AND BEES

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2015/07/pesticide-found-in-70-percent-of-massachusetts-honey-samples/

Honeybee605

Pesticide found in 70 percent of Massachusetts’ honey samples

Harvard study says it’s among class of pesticides implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder

More than 70 percent of pollen and honey samples collected from foraging bees in Massachusetts contain at least one neonicotinoid, a class of pesticide that has been implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), in which adult bees abandon their hives during winter, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The study appeared online in the July 23 issue of the Journal of Environmental Chemistry.

“Data from this study clearly demonstrated the ubiquity of neonicotinoids in pollen and honey samples that bees are exposed to during the seasons when they are actively foraging across Massachusetts. Levels of neonicotinoids that we found in this study fall into ranges that could lead to detrimental health effects in bees, including CCD,” said Chensheng (Alex) Lu, associate professor of environmental exposure biology in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard Chan School and lead author of the study.

Since 2006, there have been significant losses of honeybee colonies. Scientists, policymakers, farmers, and beekeepers are concerned with this problem because bees are prime pollinators of roughly one-third of all crops worldwide.

Previous studies analyzed either stored pollen collected from hives or pollen samples collected from bees at a single point in time. In this study, the Harvard Chan School researchers looked at pollen samples collected over time — during spring and summer months when bees forage — from the same set of hives across Massachusetts. Collecting samples in this way enabled the researchers to determine variations in levels of eight neonicotinoids, and to identify high-risk locations or months for neonicotinoid exposure for bees. The researchers worked with 62 Massachusetts beekeepers who volunteered to collect monthly samples of pollen and honey from foraging bees, from April through August 2013, using pollen traps on the landings of beehives. The beekeepers then sent the samples to the researchers.

The researchers analyzed 219 pollen and 53 honey samples from 62 hives, from 10 out of 14 counties in Massachusetts. They found neonicotinoids in pollen and honey for each month collected, in each location — suggesting that bees are at risk of neonicotinoid exposure any time they are foraging anywhere in Massachusetts.

The most commonly detected neonicotinoid was imidacloprid, followed by dinotefuran. Particularly high concentrations of neonicotinoids were found in Worcester County in April, in Hampshire County in May, in Suffolk County in July, and in Essex County in June, suggesting that, in these counties, certain months pose significant risks to bees.

The new findings suggest that neonicotinoids are being used throughout Massachusetts. Not only do these pesticides pose a significant risk for the survival of honeybees, but they also may pose health risks for people inhaling neonicotinoid-contaminated pollen, Lu said. “The data presented in this study should serve as a basis for public policy that aims to reduce neonicotinoid exposure,” he said.

Other Harvard Chan School authors of the study included doctoral student Chi-Hsuan Chang, research fellow Lin Tao, and research associate Mei Chen.

Funding for this study came from the Woodshouse Foundation and the Harvard-NIEHS Center for Environmental Health.